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Saturday 10-6

Sunday 12-5

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Antennas

1946-49 Antennas

After the war, stations broadcast with higher power, but until the mid 50s there were many areas of the country with poor television service. Large outdoor antennas were often needed.

Evolution of a TV Antenna Television Master Antennas
Field Testing for TV Antennas The Television Receiver Antenna
High-Gain Directional Array for Marginal TV Reception TV Antenna is Directional
How to Select Your TV Antenna TV Site Testing and Measurement Techniques
Special-Purpose Television Antennas  

Here are some early antennas from the late 40s, when channel one was still in use

 

Courtesy of Duke University Libraries Ad*Access

Courtesy of Duke University Libraries Ad*Access

From Radio and TV Retailing, October 1945

Amphenol Folded Dipole Array

Installation manual and specifications 

Courtesy of Chuck Azzalina

Early Philco Antenna

This antenna is cut for channel 3. It appears in a 1946 Philco publication, "The Servicing of Television Receivers", which contains mostly information on and pictures from TV sets made before World War Two. This antenna could have been made before, during, or immediately after the war. It was donated to the museum by Chuck Azzalina.

1946 RCA Antennas

Courtesy of Chuck Azzalina

Telesine